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Osseous Grafts or “Bone Grafts”

Missing teeth, periodontal disease, and trauma can all cause bone loss in the jaws and around the teeth. More than just a threat to oral health and function, bone loss can also alter the facial appearance by reducing the support for the face’s natural contours.

The natural stimulation to the underlying bone that is generated by the forces of biting or chewing is lost when a tooth is extracted. In fact, in the first year after tooth loss, bone width can be reduced by as much as 25%.

The dental bone can be restored to its original dimensions through grafting operations to maintain facial aesthetics, correct periodontal disease damage, and aid the effectiveness of procedures such as the installation of dental implants. A bone transplant serves as a platform or “scaffolding” for new bone formation. The material for a bone graft can come from the patient, other donors, or synthetic bone-like materials.

The dental bone can be restored to its original dimensions through grafting operations to maintain facial aesthetics, correct periodontal disease damage, and aid the effectiveness of procedures such as the installation of dental implants. A bone transplant serves as a platform or “scaffolding” for new bone formation. The material for a bone graft can come from the patient, other donors, or synthetic bone-like materials.

Depending on the needs of the situation, there are numerous sorts of grafting procedures that can be performed with this approach.

A bone transplant can be inserted right after a tooth is extracted or later on following tooth loss. When a bone graft is placed at the time of tooth extraction, the amount of bone loss in the area is reduced, allowing for the hard tissue support needed for the eventual implantation of a dental implant. A second surgical surgery is required to remove the soft tissue, expose the underlying bone, put a graft, and then suture the soft tissue back into place when a bone graft is placed sometime after tooth loss.

A technique – known as a “sinus lift” may be performed on patients who do not have enough bone for a dental implant to replace a maxillary back tooth (upper back tooth). The sinus membrane is lifted, and bone graft material is placed between the jaw and the floor of the sinus to provide the necessary bone height for a dental implant to be successful.

Aesthetic ridge augmentation to restore the natural curves of the bone is occasionally performed in preparation for fixed bridgework to provide a more cosmetically acceptable result, in addition to bone grafting for ridge preservation or enlargement to allow for dental implants.

Special membranes and biologically active materials can be placed over the grafting material to direct tissue regeneration, preserve the graft, and promote healing.

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